Tuesday 15 October, 2019

After Ethiopia crash, CAL to test new planes before adding to fleet

FILE- In this Nov. 14, 2018, file photo Boeing 737 MAX 8 planes are parked near Boeing Co.'s 737 assembly facility in Renton, Wash. Investigators were rushing to the scene of a devastating plane crash in Ethiopia on Sunday, March 10, 2019, an accident that could renew safety questions about the newest version of Boeing's popular 737 airliner. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)

FILE- In this Nov. 14, 2018, file photo Boeing 737 MAX 8 planes are parked near Boeing Co.'s 737 assembly facility in Renton, Wash. Investigators were rushing to the scene of a devastating plane crash in Ethiopia on Sunday, March 10, 2019, an accident that could renew safety questions about the newest version of Boeing's popular 737 airliner. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)

Caribbean Airlines (CAL) has reiterated its commitment to safety in the wake of a tragic Ethiopian Airlines crash which claimed the lives of more than 150 people. 

Authorities say 22 UN staff were among the dead, many heading for an assembly of the UN Environment Programme in Nairobi.

Aircraft manufacturer Boeing is now facing further questions over the safety of its 737 Max 8 jet, the aircraft involved in the Ethiopia Airlines crash, as this is the second fatal crash in the past five months. 

More than 300 Boeing 737 Max planes are in operation, while 5,000 have been ordered worldwide since 2017.

Many airline carriers have since grounded their planes. 

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State-owned CAL is among the carriers ordering the Max 8 jet, having announced last November its intention to add 12 aircraft to its fleet, beginning in the fourth quarter of 2019.

The airline in a statement on Monday, however, assured that it will put the safety of its passengers, crew and operations first.  

CAL promised to incorporate the procedural and training elements necessary to comply with all regulations and instructions before any new aircraft is introduced to its fleet. 

It further stated that the airline industry is "one of the most highly regulated industries in the world and there are rigorous processes and regulatory procedures to follow before any aircraft is brought into service."  

Below is the full updated statement from Caribbean Airlines: 

Caribbean Airlines extends heartfelt sympathy to the families and loved ones of the passengers and employees impacted by Ethiopian Airlines flight ET302.   

This accident has raised speculative concern re: the Boeing MAX 8 aircraft, however, investigations by the relevant authorities are in progress and the cause of this accident remains undetermined at this time. 

The airline industry is one of the most highly regulated industries in the world and there are rigorous processes and regulatory procedures to follow before any aircraft is brought into service.  

Caribbean Airlines will incorporate the procedural and training elements necessary to comply with all regulations and instructions before any new aircraft is introduced to its fleet.  
 
Caribbean Airlines currently does not have the Boeing MAX 8 aircraft as part of its fleet.   
 
The airline uses the Boeing 737-800 Next Generation aircraft (this is not the MAX-8).  
 
Caribbean Airlines stands by its commitment to put the safety of its passengers, crew and operations first.

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