Thursday 5 December, 2019

Deyalsingh: New area designated for babies with bacterial infection

Health Minister Terrence Deyalsingh on Tuesday refuted media reports that the neonatal ward at the San Fernando General Hospital is operating under unsanitary conditions.

This comes after a father on Monday revealed that his son was suffering from a bacterial infection, which a doctor told him was caused by the unsanitary conditions at the ward.

Deyalsingh was responding to an urgent question from Opposition Senator Wade Mark in the Senate on what measures are being taken to rectify the situation in the neonatal ward.

The Health Minister denied that the conditions at the ward were unsanitary.

However, Deyalsingh explained that babies born with a bacterial infection were being placed too close to other babies, an issue he said that no one in authority paid attention to.

“The conditions at the neonatal intensive care unit are not unsanitary. The bacterial problem is being caused by babies being born with a bacterial infection and the cots are too close to each other so they spread from one baby to another. This problem has been ongoing for the past decade, decade and a half and nobody in authority paid attention to it.”

The Health Minister said steps are being taken to rectify the issue.

“It is my responsibility to now fix this and what I have done immediately is in two weeks an area has already been designated to be outfitted so the babies can be split up into two: those with bacterial infections and those without. I met with the RHA at 8 am this morning, we have determined the scope of works, that is going to be completed in two weeks.”

He said, in addition to this, deep cleaning of the facility has been conducted.

Deyalsingh also assured that the affected babies are receiving treatment.

He said the wider problem is that of anti-bacterial resistance, which he noted is a global problem and which he said has unfortunately found its way to the shores of Trinidad and Tobago.

“Right now, they are on a cocktail of antibiotics. Because those organisms they are multi-organisms and they are resistant to the typical antibiotics. So all of them who are infected are on a cocktail of multi antibiotics, to make sure we trap the particular infections.”

 

 

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