Sponsored

A 30-year-old man was gunned down around 3.15 am on Thursday by two criminals posing as police officers. David Doonie of Mulligan Drive, La Horquetta, was sleeping at his girlfriend's home in Malabar when the gunmen stormed in. They shot him several times before fleeing. His girlfriend was on the bed but was unharmed. Neighbours heard the raucous and contacted police. However, Doonie died at the scene. According to police, Doonie's death could belinked to a shooting inMalabar last week which left one man dead.

A vehicle which was reported stolen this week was recovered in Arima. Officers of the Northern Division recovered the blue and white Mazda 323, along Demerara Road Extension, Arima on Tuesday night. The exercise was supervised by Cpls Madeira and Sookram. Several homes were also searched in the area during the police exercise, however, nothing illegal was found. No persons were reported arrested during this exercise.


When it comes to hair care, some men stick to the basics, a haircut and the occasional shampoo with whatever they find at their fingertips at home. But, according to Derek Lekha, owner of Fame, the Grooming Club in St James, Barbados, proper hair care has many benefits. “It is recommended you wash before a haircut but if you don’t we do washes before and after as part of the service. We shampoo and style, blow-dry, wax, we put products, we do leave-in conditioners, all as part of the service and they are transformed, they get knowledge, aftercare, they learn what products to use in terms of shampoos because a lot of people use the wrong product,” he told Loop. Lekha said when it comes to shampoos, he always recommends that guys use a good brand. “There are many different types of shampoos out there for the guys. There is recovering shampoo for thinning hair, specific ones for grey hair. We would recommend the guys get a protein treatment every three to six months to put back the moisture and chemicals the hair lost from not being kept well. It doesn’t matter how long the hair is, it is hair,” he said, noting that a shampoo is recommended two or three days a week especially if you are athletic and go to the gym. “Most guys think if the hair is low you don’t need to wash it but sweat builds up on the scalp which leads to dry scalp which leads to flaking and hair loss,” he said. Derek Lekha, owner of Fame, the Grooming Club in Barbados Conditioning is important as well, he said, as shampoo strips away the natural oils from the hair. “Conditioner gives you back that shiny, healthy look,” he said. Among Lekha’s hair services is the scalp massage which, he said, has a lot of benefits in addition to making you relaxed. “A scalp massage is definitely important, it produces something called serotonin which makes you happy and relaxed. It also increases blood flow to and from the skin and creates an environment for good healthy hair growth. We recommend a steam or hot water massage to remove dead skin. That is a hazard for hair loss. “A scalp massage should be a part of your haircut regimen. It is just like having a regular massage. Many guys don’t request it because they don’t have the knowledge or know the benefits and when they do have it they are blown away,” he said. Fame has been in existence since 2014. Fame gives men the sophisticated environment they want at a lower price Lekha, 42, said he started cutting hair for his father and friends as a hobby. As his skill level improved, so did the crowd and his father recommended that he start charging people. “I felt bad to charge those guys because these are the guys I learned on so I stopped cutting hair for five years. I educated myself, did a couple of courses and enhanced my skill. I used to work for another barber before I branched out and opened my business,” he said. Lekha said at first he operated a basic barbershop but after interacting with guys and doing research on what they wanted, he decided to expand his services. He said in Barbados, there were high-end salons catering to men but they were expensive. There were no men’s barbershops for guys who wanted that nice, modern, clean, sophisticated environment that was reasonably priced. Fame filled the void. Today, Lekha's services include haircuts for kids, males, and females, shaves, hot and cold towels, hair colouring, exfoliation,beard treatment, manicures, pedicures, and all forms of hair braiding for men and women. He said he has noticed an increase in men wanting grooming services and credits that to the celebrity and brand influencer culture that is encouraging men to take care of themselves. “We recommend that you don’t stay away from a barber more than 21 days but there are those who come weekly. Guys that have beards have to come to the barber once a week to keep the beard groomed and well-kept and that is part of the haircut now. That is the number one service,” he said.

Instagram is clamping down on the advertisement of weight loss products and cosmetic procedures. Reports are that the social media platform from Wednesday would be applying age restrictions to some posts while others would be removed. Certain weight-loss products or cosmetic procedures, which encourages users to buy or include a price, will be hidden from those known to be under 18. Instagram will remove posts if they make a miraculous claim about certain diet or weight loss products, and is linked to a commercial offer such as a discount code. The new policy has been described as a win by actress Jameela Jamil, founder of body positivity movement iWeigh. Jamil has been openly critical of celebrities who peddle body enhancement procedures and weight loss products on the platform. “THIS IS HUGE NEWS.@i_weighare changing the world together. After a bunch of shouting, screaming, and petitioning... we have managed to get the attention of the people at the top, and they have heard us and want to protect us. And this is just the beginning of our efforts,” she wrote on IG. “I’ve been working with Instagram all year towards this, who were amazing to deal with, and they expressed that they passionately care about creating a safer space for us all online. This happened so much faster than I expected and I’m so proud and happy and relieved. WELL DONE to the many people who have been working towards this huge change. This is a mass effort. This is an extraordinary win that is going to make a big difference. Influencers have to be more responsible. ❤” View this post on Instagram THIS IS HUGE NEWS. @i_weigh are changing the world together. After a bunch of shouting, screaming, and petitioning... we have managed to get the attention of the people at the top, and they have heard us and want to protect us. And this is just the beginning of our efforts. As of now, if you’re under 18, you will no longer be exposed to any diet/detox products, and for all other ages; all fad products that have bogus, unrealistic claims will be taken down and easy to report. I’ve been working with Instagram all year towards this, who were amazing to deal with, and they expressed that they passionately care about creating a safer space for us all online. This happened so much faster than I expected and I’m so proud and happy and relieved. WELL DONE to the many people who have been working towards this huge change. This is a mass effort. This is an extraordinary win that is going to make a big difference. Influencers have to be more responsible. ❤️ A post shared by Jameela Jamil (@jameelajamilofficial) on Sep 18, 2019 at 10:08am PDT


Loop Breakfast Bites is a round-up of the top international stories making headlines. [related node_id='076115df-50eb-46ee-8fdd-241704f912f5'] [related node_id='b6f5fe3b-caca-4775-85f8-6aa209f811de'] [related node_id='01141d2b-c246-4142-934e-8ae72f4d7e99'] [related node_id='7f3719c4-2a6c-43e4-a523-e028e6b93399'] [related node_id='5b8dd5fd-5f13-4ca1-943f-7dcf710f1f40']

President Donald Trump signed his name on a newly constructed section of the US-Mexico border wall, calling it a "world-class security system" that will be virtually impenetrable. Trump toured a section of the border wall in San Diego's Otay Mesa area on Wednesday. It was a return trip for the Republican president, who travelled there in March 2018 to see border wall prototypes that authorities later destroyed to make way for 14 miles (22.4 kilometres) of steel, concrete-filled bollards currently under construction. Before construction began, the border in San Diego was protected by an initial layer of sheet metal that was easily blow-torched and a second, more formidable layer that could be compromised with powerful, battery-operated saws. "It was like a sheet metal, and people would just knock it over like just routinely," Trump said, referring to the initial layer that was replaced. He stood with construction workers and top Customs and Border Protection, Army Corps of Engineers and homeland security officials. Mark Morgan, acting commissioner of US Customs and Border Protection, defended the project, dismissing critics who call it the "president's vanity wall." "I'm here to tell you that's false," he said, telling reporters that Trump reached out to border experts to find out what they needed. "You listened to the agents," he told Trump. Trump highlighted features of the wall, which he said have been studied by three other countries. He said the wall absorbs heat — "You can fry an egg on that wall." The concrete goes deep into the ground to prevent tunnelling. And agents can see through it to spot possible threats on the Mexican side of the border, he said. "When the wall is built, it will be virtually impossible to come over illegally, and then we're able to take border control and put them at points of entry," Trump said. He heaped praise on the Mexican government, especially for sending tens of thousands of troops to its northern and southern borders to help slow the flow of migrants headed toward the United States. He said President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador "has been great." "We're all thrilled," Trump said. "You know Mexico has never done anything to impede people from pouring into our country and now they're doing just the opposite. They've really been incredible." The president revelled in details of construction, saying Border Patrol and military officials persuaded him to adopt more expensive designs. He said he dropped a preference for solid concrete, instead opting for concrete-filled steel bollards that allow agents to see through to Mexico to spot assailants throwing rocks or other projectiles. He agreed to go along with barriers that are 30 feet (9 meters) high and double-layered in heavily travelled areas. "It's the Rolls-Royce version," Trump said. When Trump asked Army Corps Lt. Gen. Todd Semonite to explain how technology embedded in the wall alerts agents to illegal activity, he was told, "Sir, there could be some merit in not discussing it." Semonite offered new details on the pace of construction that underscored how quickly the administration plans to move. It has built 66 miles (106 kilometers), has 251 miles (403 kilometers) in various stages of construction at 17 sites and has contracts for 163 miles (262 kilometers) planned in the next 90 days, the general said. Additional land on private property is expected to take more time. Crews are installing 270 panels a day, each one with eight bollards. Trump, whose construction targets have shifted, said he expects to build up to about 550 miles (885 kilometres) of wall along the 1,954-mile (3,126-kilometer) border and said the administration will pause at about 400 miles (643 kilometres) to assess what more is needed. Trump said cost concerns led him to put aside his preference to paint the wall black, which absorbs heat. He said the wall was "a good, strong rust colour" and could be painted later. Trump is riding a string of wins on the wall and on immigration in general. Arrests on the Mexican border arrests plunged in August, well beyond the usual summer dip, from a 13-year high reached in May. Arrests are still relatively high, topping 50,000 in 10 of the last 11 months, compared with only eight months over the previous decade. Last week, the Supreme Court gave Trump a green light to deny asylum to anyone who passes through another country on the way to the US border with Mexico without having first sought protection in the third country. The Pentagon recently diverted $3.6 billion from 127 military construction projects to build 175 miles (280 kilometres) of barriers on the border. Trump had promised during the 2016 presidential campaign that Mexico would pay for the wall.